Nov. 4th, 2015

naath: (Default)
Died on this day in 1360 aged 65 Elizabeth de Clare (my toy,wikipedia). Grand-daughter of Edward I. Elizabeth married three times, firstly in a double marriage she and her brother married the son and daughter of the Earl of Ulster. After the death of her first husband, her brother, and her father Elizabeth was a rich woman and her uncle Edward II wanted to pick her a new husband, but she was abducted by the former Justicar of Ireland to whom she had been engaged before leaving for England (so maybe that's "abducted" it's not clear) but died of typhoid. She then thirdly married an Irish baron who was at the time a favourite of Edward II, but then he switched sides and joined the Marcher lords in rebellion and Elizabeth got caught up in all the fighting. She survived that unpleasantness and went on to found Clare College, Cambridge.

Born on this day in 1650 to William II Prince of Orange and Mary Princess Royal, King William II of Scotland & III of England (my toy,wikipedia). William was born Prince of Orange, since his father died just before he was born. In 1688 he invaded England alongside his wife Mary (daughter of King James II) because many in the English establishment wanted rid of the Catholic James. He met little resistance, and was soon installed as King (with Mary crowned Queen in her own right). He faced much more opposition in Ireland. After this the law was changed such that Catholics (and spouses of Catholics) were (still are) excluded from the succession.
naath: (Default)
Read:
Never Let Me Go; Kazuo Ishiguro

So, this is written as a first-person account of school and then growing up, but a character who has a very unusual place in society (that gradually becomes clear throughout the book, and revealing it is a spoiler). I found it readable, but the style of the writing is really very very different to anything I would have written or said about my own growing up - the main character/narrator (who for most of the novel is a teenage girl) never seems willing to ask hard questions, or think logically about anything; and is forever describing "meaningful" glances/pauses/avoidances-of-topics in conversations in a way that would have (probably still would) entirely escaped me. I hesitate to say "unrealistic!" because surely my experience (nerdy) is not a universal experience for teenage girls but I couldn't really relate to the characters, especially since they never seem to do much of anything to change their fate.

Reading:
Mistborn: shadows of self; Brandon Sanderson

The further adventures of Wax and Wayne (Either this is the best or worst name for a cop-duo ever). I'm enjoying it, not sure it's a good starting place for Mistborn.

Profile

naath: (Default)
naath

August 2017

S M T W T F S
  12345
6 789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags