naath: (Default)
I read stuff...

Once Broken Faith - yep, another Toby Daye book. More of the same, yaaaaaay!

Fix - the end of the 'mancer series. I liked the ending, which nicely concluded the story imo.

A Face Like Glass - weird, but good. I think "weird but good" might be what Hardinge *does*

The Other Half of the Sky - I have been reading this collection for *ages*, because turns out I don't really like collections of unconnected short stories. Too much attention hopping! Give me a nice multi-volume epic.

reading...

Americahna - being that this is not SFF it is not "what I usually read". So far I'm liking it though, I guess I should read more different things more often.
naath: (Default)
Read: I read some Seanan short fiction: Threnody for for Little Girl, With Tuna, at the End of the World - which is just so perfectly sad, and In Little Stars - which was a reasonably addition to the Toby Daye universe. Both are from her Patreon, I don't know if/when there will be general availability

Reading: Trekonomics. Because I'm a GIANT NERD... and I'm not ashamed. Economics requires fewer currently utterly impossible things than physics, and this seems to largely be an optimistic book about how post-scarcity economics could be really good because humans are basically decent people. I've not finished reading it yet.
naath: (Default)
Read: Necessity. This is an excellent conclusion to the series. Which as a whole is very well written and not at all the sort of thing I've read before, which is nice.

Reading: well, I did *just* finish it. I have some Seanan stories she wrote for her Patreon to read, and then I'm sure I'll find something in the giant pile of unread books.
naath: (Default)
Read: a pile of Seanan short fiction; now read all the free stuff from her website.

Reading: Necessity (Thessaly #3) by Jo Walton. Just started, so no real opinion yet.
naath: (Default)
Oops, missed a week.

Read: More Seanan shorts. Now I've read all the free Incryptid shorts.

Reading: the Long Cosmos by Baxter and Prattchet. Turns out they wrote these much faster than they could publish, and this was really co-written with PTerry not just following on from a joint idea. So it is, I guess, his last book. Sadness. So far, so good, a lot of the same as the other Long Earth books. Don't start here.
naath: (Default)
Read: more shorts by Seanan McGuire

Reading: yet more of same.

These stories are entertaining background to the novels, but probably of little interest to people who aren't already fans.
naath: (Default)
Read:

league of dragons. I thought this was quite a nice end to the story, but don't start here. No more dragon stories :(

rise, Mira Grant. Shorts from the newsflesh world, 2 of which are new. If you liked the novels and want MOAR you will want to read this. Contains spoilers for the novels, not a good place to start.

shorts by Seanan McGuire - star of new mexico (oops, out of order), one hell of a ride, no place like home. These are free on her website, fitting in with the incryptid novels. I'm enjoying them. HAIL.

reading: more shorts...
naath: (Default)
Read: Children of Earth and Sky, GGK. I liked this, Sarantium has fallen to the Asharites, but this book is more about trade and intrigue than fighting.

Reading: League of Dragons, Novik. The final Temeraire :(
naath: (Default)
Read
Every Heart a Doorway , Seanan McGuire
A story about portal fantasies and how it feels to come back from one , good as ever.


Reading
Children of Earth and Sky , Guy Gavriel Kay
In the same world as Sailing to Sarantium , which has fallen to the Asherites. So far quite good.

This post brought to you with the help of dasher . Steep learning curve but helpful
naath: (Default)
Read:

N K Jemisin - the Fifth Season. I liked this, but not as much as Uprooted. Suffers from being 1/3 which means I have to waaaaaait for the end.


From the Editorial Page of the Falchester Weekly Review (Memoir by Lady Trent, #4.5) - short story. Cute, but wouldn't make sense without having read the novels I think.

Stage of Fools (Seanan McGuire) - short story, Tybalt focused. mmmmm puss cat.

Reading:

Every Heart a Doorway (Seanan McGuire).
naath: (Default)
oops, missed a few there. lots of books then!

read:
miss Peregrine #3. I thought this was a good end to the trilogy, and it *is* an ending, so you needn't fear starting it and getting trapped in "waiting for the next book" hell.

Virgin Widow: England's Forgotten Queen (Anne O'Brien). This is a novel about Anne Neville, I have read (I think) 3 novels and 1 not-novel featuring her heavily, so I think the subtitle is entirely untrue (many other Queens get less; quick, what can you tell me about Isabella of Angouleme?). I like O'Brien's style and I think I shall be reading more of her work.

The Raven and the Reindeer (Kingfisher, T.). This is a brilliant retelling of the Snow Queen story. I'm quite fond of fairy tales retold anyway, so this was clearly right up my street. Very good. Quite short.

Only Ever Yours (Louise O'Neil). This is rather like the Handmaid's Tale, but YA. It comes with a serious Content Note for disordered eating (of all sorts) and body shaming and implied sexual assault. And it's a really nasty distopia, and not really a pleasant read. I found it oddly compelling.

Lady Trent #4. Our Heroine sets out to do MORE SCIENCE, in a new part of the world. Adventure, mild peril, lady scientist... DRAGONS. Seriously, what is not to like? (waiting for #5 is what is not to like).


Reading:
Well, I was going to read Children of Earth and Sky (Kay) but the Hugo packet came out and reminded me to read TH Fifth Season (Jemisin), so I shall do that.
naath: (Default)
read:

Tales of Arilland and Trix and the Fairy Queen by Alethea Kontis. Tales of Arilland is shorts, and entertaining. Trix and the Fairy Queen is better. In any case these continue on from the previous novels.

Mrs Peregrine books 1 and 2, by Ransom Riggs. I enjoyed these, much darker than your usual 'boy finds out he is magical' sort of a book.

reading:
Mrs Peregrine book 3

also I am listening to Ancillary Justice, which mostly means I'm discovering I was saying it all wrong.
naath: (Default)
read:

Cut. Which is a very graphic memoir, and not at all an easy read. Hibo Wardere is now an anti-FGM activist, I hope she (and others doing the same work) succeed, I'm not sure how I can help.

Trixter, Dearest, and Messenger by Alethea Kontis. Continuing the series that began with Enchanted. These are enjoyably fairy-tale stories. (Trixter is more of a novella, and Messenger is a deleted-chapter from Dearest and barely a short story)

reading:
Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs. I've seen this recommended all over the place, so far I'm finding it fairly interesting.

forgot about previously:
while I was walking a very long way I listened to the audio book of House of Shattered Wings by Alliete de Bodard. Which I found interesting but not as good as some of her other stuff.
naath: (Default)
read: collapse (Diamond). Interesting case studies but very repetitive analysis imo

Reading: Cut (https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/29540497-cut) This is not a pleasant read.
naath: (Default)
still Collapse. er, or more accurately 'plants vs zombies'...
naath: (Default)
Reading: Still Collapse, it's long and not as gripping as fast-paced urban fantasy... but still interesting
naath: (Default)
Read: Chimera. The end of Parasitology. I do not like these as much as I like Seanan's non-horror stuff or as much as I liked the zombie stuff. But I liked it enough to know the end, which, er, is not actually a high bar, I am a completest by nature.

Reading: Collapse. Diamond. So far, so interesting.

To read: I got the raven/reindeer book ya'll rave about so much.

Programming note:

My little finger on my right hand has had pins-and-needles for well over a week. Typing is hard. So sorry, not posting stuff. I hope this is rsi and will go away with less typing/mousing. But maybe it isn't? should I be seeing a doctor el-pronto? Very annoying anyway. Left handed mousing is also, I wish to report, much harder than I expected it would be (I'm generally ambi- if I practice enough).
naath: (Default)
Read: Chaos Choreography
Well, that was, as expected, an enjoyable installment of the series. More Verity, and lots and lots of dancing. Yay, dancing. Probably this is not the place to start (it is volume 5), but if anyone does want to borrow it I'm done with it and have the US paperback sitting around taking up space (did someone borrow my copy of Red Rose Chain? I can't find it, I'm probably a muppett)

Reading: Chimera; Mira Grant (Seanan McGuire in disguise)
This series is less fun that that ^^ one, and the protagonist is a bit tiresomely stupid a lot of the time (she's getting better I guess). Anyway I want to know how it turns out so...

To read:
Since I am planning a looooooong walk I have bought some audio books (which with GREAT FAFF I managed to get onto my mp3 player, thanks Audible for not just letting us buy mp3s) including House of Shattered Wings, which I am told is good. I don't usually like audio books, but something to listen to while I walk is probably great. Any other suggestions of good audio books would be great.
naath: (Default)
read:
future visions

A nice collection of shorts, but I'm mostly reminded that I don't really like short stories much.

The West Highland Way.

Interesting and hopefully useful.

Lightweight Camping, John Traynor

Mostly not new info, rather rude about people who do heavyweight camping.

Reading:

Chaos Choreography, Seanan McGuire

more Incryptid. gave in and imported the paperback. Stupid UK publishers being so slow
naath: (Default)
Read:

Voyage of the Basilisk. Dragons! A round-the-world trip on a sailing ship (just like Charles Darwin!) Dragons! Excitement, peril, SCIENCE (of dragons), etc. I am very much enjoying these books (don't start here).

Reading:

The Lie Tree. I heard good things, so now I am reading it. But I've only just started, so no opinion yet.
naath: (Default)
Read:
Gentleman Jole.

I <3 this book. I think it probably makes really quite a lot more sense if you have read the other Vorkosigan books though, so probably not a good place to begin.

Reading:
Voyage of the Basilisk (#3 in the memoirs of Lady Trent)

MOAR DRAGONS. YISSSSSS.
naath: (Default)
Read:
Tropic of Serpents, a Memoir by Lady Trent; Marie Brennan

continuing this fictional memoir. This is Victorian Naturalists BUT WITH DRAGONS, it's set in a different world one main difference is that THERE ARE DRAGONS but also everywhere has different names and the main religion in the not-Europe seems more Jewish than Christian in influence. This installment adds a second woman to the main cast (which is quite a *small* main cast, of Intrepid Naturalists)

Reading:
Gentleman Jole and the Red Queen; Bujold.

This is a Cordelia novel. YAAAAAAY for Cordelia. It is less... hectic than a Miles novel and vastly less FULL OF STUPID than the Ivan book. My favorite thing so far is finding out that (spoilers) Pbeqryvn vf n yvne, naq gur zbfg boabkvbhf guvatf fur fnlf va gur jubyr frevrf vf n gbgny yvr, ba obgu pbhagf.
naath: (Default)
I finish sharing knife #3 and am now on sharking knife #4; the series continues much the same and spoiler spoiler etc. also there is a map (I hadn't spotted that in volume 1) and in volume 3 Our Heroes go On A Journey which is about the most cliche fantasy thing ever, but it isn't really very cliche about it.
naath: (Default)
Read:
Sharing Knife volumes 1 and 2; Bujold

Reading:
Sharing Knife volume 3

So there are some books that I start reading and then I just avoid reading more of because they are boring and then I won't finish them until the other alternative is "watch paint dry".

And there are some books that I'll happily read at the times I usually set aside for reading, and then eventually I'll finish.

and then there are some books that I find really hard to put down and will insist on reading at times I'm supposed to be doing something else... like sleeping, or running, or getting back to work. These books are in this last category. Really really hard to put down! At least for me.
naath: (Default)
Read:

The Harvest; Chuck Wendig.

This is #3 in the Heartland trilogy. I enjoyed the other two, and I enjoyed this one as well but I expect it wouldn't work as a standalone. It is YA SF in the currently common "teens fight against a dystopia" model.

Reading:

Beguilement; Bujold

This is #1 in the Sharing Knife series. I've not got hugely far into it but so far am enjoying it (not a surprise, I usually find Bujold's prose compelling). This book needs to come with trigger warnings for "attempted rape" and "miscarriage".
naath: (Default)
Reading:
The Harvest by Chuck Wendig

This is volume 3 of the Heartland Trilogy, it succeeds in being More Of The Same. But you shouldn't start here!

WoIaF: finished the bit about all the places in Westeros, now onto not!Westeros. This book has very pretty pictures

WoTC: not read much (still on A), this book has a lack of pretty pictures and a lot of very dull entries, but the entries for the more major characters are very interesting. Big Book Of Spoilers, so really.... don't start here.

I have decided to revive my GoodReads account this year, if anyone is on there and would like to be my friend...

I've decided not to do any of those "read a book that..." challenges, because my To Read Pile is sky high as it is ;-p
naath: (Default)
All the books I finished this year...

I read 60 books this year, by a total of 35 authors of whole-books and a number of other authors of parts-of-books (mostly shorts in collections). 52 were some sort of SFF, and 1 a book of lit-crit *about* SFF books... (3 were history, 2 comics, 1 autobiography, and 1 a book about rock climbing safety). 36 were by individual authors who are women (Seanan McGuire features... heavily), and 18 by individual authors who are men (the others were by multiple authors), 7 were by authors I can identify as non-white from their wikipedia entries (not everyone puts their racial identity on their biography).
naath: (Default)
Read:

Sorcerer to the Crown; Zen Cho

This was tolerably interesting, I found the language somewhat stilted but less so than Strange and Norrel. Regency England but with MAGIC is I suppose a sub-genre quite firmly here to stay. Happily Napoleon does not feature. This is the author's first fantasy novel.

A Natural History of Dragons: a Memoir by Lady Trent; Marie Brennan

This is Industrial Revolution BUT WITH DRAGONS (what a nice change from the Regency), although the setting is a fantasy world (there a trains, that makes it Industrial Revolution, obviously). There are DRAGONS, and a young lady determined to pursue scholarship in the face of Patriarchy. Also there is intrigue and suspense &c &c I liked this so much I straight away bought the sequels when I had finished (there are currently three books in the series, I don't know if there will be more).

Reading:
A World of Ice and Fire
Wheel of Time Companion

Both of these are chock full of SPOILERS for their respective series and of interest only to the dedicated fan; WoIaF is more accessible being full of gorgeous pictures and written as history text; WoTC reads like a dictionary/encyclopedia and has hundreds of entries of the form "Jo Blogs; Rand met him once in Caemlyn" alongside the rather more interesting (and SPOILERIFIC) ones about Our Heroes/Villains/McGuffins/&c. Also I have both of these in paper form, so will be forever about reading them as they are heavy.
naath: (Default)
Read:
SPQR (Mary Beard)

An interesting history of Rome from its foundation to the Emperor Comodus (of Gladiator fame). Thorough and obviously well researched, but readable and accessible if you don't know who all these people are. Also not just a list of Famous Men and Battles Fought but also details about every day life in Rome.


The Flux (Ferret Steinmetz)

I read Ferret's first book (Flex, to which this is the sequel, there will be a third - Fix) because I read his blog and find him entertaining. I read this one because I wanted to know what happens next.

Reading:
World of Ice and Fire
naath: (Default)
Reading:
SPQR. Still. It's very readable, but also quite long.

Also, I forgot, on paper I'm reading the "world of ice and fire" which I got in Sweden (in English). It's pretty with lots of pictures so needs to be on paper. Also the "author" is clearly not up on the events of the books...
naath: (Default)
it's Wednesday again! I'm still reading SPQR.
naath: (Default)
Reading:
SPQR.

It's long. And dense. Lots of interesting stuff about the early history of Rome.

To Read:
Chimera... which I am RESISTING.
naath: (Default)
Read:
Mistborn: Shadows of Self. Sanderson, Brandon

Continuing adventures of Wax and Wayne. Crimes are investigate, questions answered, and raised. Also - explicit Cosmere stuff, yay.

Reading:
SPQR. Beard, Mary
A history of Rome. So far so interesting.
naath: (Default)
still reading Mistborn. Clearly slacking off.
naath: (Default)
Read:
Never Let Me Go; Kazuo Ishiguro

So, this is written as a first-person account of school and then growing up, but a character who has a very unusual place in society (that gradually becomes clear throughout the book, and revealing it is a spoiler). I found it readable, but the style of the writing is really very very different to anything I would have written or said about my own growing up - the main character/narrator (who for most of the novel is a teenage girl) never seems willing to ask hard questions, or think logically about anything; and is forever describing "meaningful" glances/pauses/avoidances-of-topics in conversations in a way that would have (probably still would) entirely escaped me. I hesitate to say "unrealistic!" because surely my experience (nerdy) is not a universal experience for teenage girls but I couldn't really relate to the characters, especially since they never seem to do much of anything to change their fate.

Reading:
Mistborn: shadows of self; Brandon Sanderson

The further adventures of Wax and Wayne (Either this is the best or worst name for a cop-duo ever). I'm enjoying it, not sure it's a good starting place for Mistborn.
naath: (Default)
Read:

Star Wars, Aftermath; Chuck Wendig

I picked this up because I have enjoyed Wendig's other work and because it had a number of terrible reviews of the form "urgh, gay people". I haven't read any Star Wars tie-in novels in years and years and haven't watched any of the films since I saw Revenge of the Sith around the time it came out... so I'm sure many of the subtle background details entirely escaped me. There are indeed gay people, also women in positions of power and responsibility. The story is set after Return of the Jedi, and shows that Empires are not overthrown as easily as all that. I enjoyed it but expect that I would have enjoyed it more were I more saturated in the Star Wars universe.

Reading:

Never Let Me Go; Kazuo Ishiguro

I saw a trailer for the film on a DVD we rented and remembered I wanted to read the book... although I don't recall why. So far it is reasonably interesting.

To Read:
I've got a bunch of interesting looking things, I might try embarking on Mary Beard's SPQR which might take a while
naath: (Default)
Read: The Dark Forest. Cixin Liu

Sequel to Three Body. New translator (I can't tell, but you might be able to). I liked this, I thought it was a good sequel, which raises some interesting questions. The Trisolaran tech/science remains firmly in the "magic" category; I continue to assume that the "this style looks like it should be hard SF" is my cultural background speaking, having not read any other Chinese SF to know how this stands in that context.

Reading:
I started reading Star Wars: Aftermath because Chuck Wendig wrote it and I heard that it was TERRIBLE and had GAY PEOPLE in it... which was obviously rather more of a recomendation than the annoying people thought it would be ;-p

But then Ancillary Mercy came out, so now I'm reading that. So far so excellent.
naath: (Default)
Reading: the Dark Forest (still). Now I'm about 80% through I can say that I'm enjoying it, I haven't noticed the difference-in-translation (other people might, I'm a bit rubbish at that sort of thing), it's quite dense reading (probably because I'm bad at understanding Chinese writing, even in English, especially I'm bad at Chinese names) and not going super fast. Story progresses, female characters remain sadly not very present, science continues entirely made up.

I suspect I will drag this one out until Ancillary Mercy is out, but if I don't I have a pile of other stuff to read...
naath: (Default)
Reading: Last First Snow. Apparently have had less time to read this week. I'm liking it.
naath: (Default)
Read:
*Pocket Apocalypse (Seanan)

Yay Australia! Boo werewolves! Incryptid volume 4, so not a great place to start although they are reasonably stand-alone. Has a "lets meet my family, they hate you, and also they think they should be able to control who I date even though I'm a grown-ass woman" theme running strongly through it which is very ANGRY making (it's not written as *good* mind, or I'd have thrown the e-reader at a wall and never bought another Seanan book again)

*Shepherd's Crown (Pterry)

SO SAD. Sad book is sad. Good-bye Discworld. *Sniff*.

*Of Noble Family (Mary Robinette Kowal)

This is the last volume of MRK's Glamourist Histories, and certainly not a good place to start with them. The protagonists go to Antigua and have Exploits, and much more would be Spoilerific. MRK hired someone to make the Antiguan speakers actually speak correctly, which I presume averted much FAIL, and the protags are anti-slavery, but this is turn-of-the-19th-century Antigua, there is a great deal of horrible things happening.

*The End of All Things (Scalzi)

The latest in the Old Man's War universe. Excitement! Intrigue! Hafte Sorvalh doesn't eat any churros :(

Reading:
*Last First Snow (Max Gladstone)

Just started. This is the latest in the Craft sequence.
naath: (Default)
So I posted whilst away, but in no detail, because I was on my phone, I repeat those records here (so this is "read in the last three weeks"):

Read:

*Dune
that was interesting enough,but not so hugely interesting that I'm desperate to read any of the sequels. In particular it was very annoying the way people were demanding respect just because of who they are, without demonstrating any reason that you might respect them

Of the October Daye series by Seanan McGuire:
*Late Eclipses
*One Salt Sea (contains mermaids, was reading when saw the little mermaid
statue)
*Ashes of Honour
*Chimes at Midnight
*The Winter Long
*Red Rose Chain (acquired from SF bookstore in Stockholm, lucky me)

Which is me completely caught up! Yay. Not much I can say about the later installments without spoiling the earlier. I find the writing seriously engaging and few of these took me more than 2 days (of vacation, so plenty of time to read) and all were very hard to put down. Now I need to read all the short-fiction... Predictably I love Tybalt best.

*The Philosopher Kings (afterword says author spent much time in Copenhagen
national museum was there when finished reading it) by Jo Walton
Sequel to the Just City, continues amazing.

*Chalion series by Bujold (all 3 novels and Penric's Demon).
I liked these, but not as much as I like Vorkosigan probably because there's less character-continuity between the books which makes them flow less well into each other.

Reading:
*Pocket Apocalypse by Seanan McGuire
this is the latest InCryptid novel, which I waited to get until I could get a UK ebook. As with the previous it is very good although Riley is VERY ANNOYING and I want to thump him.

Next up:
I think the honest answer to this is "Shepherd's Crown" the last PTerry (*sniff*), although I have a whole bunch of stuff I've bought and not read yet to plow through so lots of choices.
naath: (Default)
Read:
Ashes of Honour
Chimes at Midnight
The Winter Long
The Curse of Chalion
Red Rose Chain (acquired from SF bookstore in Stockholm, lucky me)
naath: (Default)
Read..
Dune
Late Eclipses
One Salt Sea (contains mermaids, was reading when saw the little mermaid
statue)
The Philosopher Kings (afterword says author spent much time in Copenhagen
national museum was there when finished reading it)
naath: (Default)
Read:

Grant,Mira (pen-name of Seanan McGuire): Apocalypse Scenario #683 The Box

this is a novella, and not part of any on-going series. I read it mostly because I'm being completest about the author's work, I didn't think it was very interesting tbh.

McGuire, Seanan:
Rosemary and Rue
A Local Habitation
An Artificial Night

I started R&R last week, and, er, got seriously hooked. These books were really really hard to put down. Forced myself not to start on the next one just yet (saving them for vacation reading). October Daye is a changeling private investigator, and boy does she find some interesting things to investigate. The books are urban-fantasy, and fairly dark (with a lot of violence and death).

Reading:
Herbert,Frank: Dune

This was on the list of "SFF books people claim to have read but haven't" and I actually hadn't read it (or claimed to) but now I am. So far it is interesting but not as compulsively readable as Seanan's work. I am aware that there are many sequels - are any of them worth reading?

To Read:
The rest of the October Daye books; Philosopher Kings (the new Jo Walton); Last First Snow (the new Max Gladstone); Pocket Apocalypse (the latest work in Seanan's other urban fantasy series, which clearly I need to read not-adjacent to the Toby Daye books as this will be confusing); a lot of Bujold's fantasy works; the Crusades Through Arab Eyes... is this list long enough? we shall see when I get back from 14 days of vacation that includes nearly 5 whole days of sitting on trains.
naath: (Default)
Read: Do Not Taunt the Octopus - Mira Grant. A newsflesh novella, the POV character is Dr Abbey. Yay! More Newsflesh! Not of much interest to anyone who hasn't already read and liked the rest.

Reading: Rosemary and Rue - Seanan McGuire. So far I'm liking this a lot. October Daye is a changeling private investigator, and she gets up to stuff.

Next: More Toby Daye... or I got the new Max Gladstone, so maybe that.
naath: (Default)
Read:
Epic Measures, Jeremy N Smith. A biography of the man who made http://vizhub.healthdata.org/gbd-compare/ happen. The biography is interesting in parts and dull in others, the data visualization is kinda cool.

Reading:
Do Not Taunt the Octopus. Mira Grant. A Newsflesh Novella. POV Dr Abbey, squee. Only just started

Next:
Well, I bought all the Bujold fantasy (and then renamed the files to have the numbers in them... grrr). And then I saw that the Toby Day series (Seanan) was finally (finally!) available in UK ebook, so I bought all of *that* too. That was a bit of an ebook spending spree... so methinks I shall read, er, some of that next then. Also still got Crusades Through Arab Eyes to read. And should probably clear puppy crap off my ereader and see what else I've got hanging around.
naath: (Default)
I am still reading Epic Measures, it is quite interesting, mostly a biography of the guy who decided we needed more Evidence for who dies of what than a review of the answers he discovered (so far). It's not as gripping as fiction, which may be why I'm not done with it yet.

Next:I got a Seanan novella, so I'll clearly be reading that next ;-p I need to think about getting books for Holiday Reading, I'm not sure what. The Locus best-of-year list might be a good place to start? Or I thought I might read Bujold's fantasy series, which I haven't read any of, even though I lovelovelove the Vorkosiverse. I've got the new Leckie and the new Walton on pre-order.
naath: (Default)
Finished:

Two books this week! (because I was nearly finished one last week)

Station Eleven:
Post-apocalyptic. Basically just people being people, having small adventures, putting life back together; with flashbacks to pre-apocalyptic lives of the same people. I liked it.

The Martian (Weir, Andy). A guy gets stuck on Mars. I thought at the start that the whole book would be just this guy stuck on Mars (and that that would be very dull) but there are other bits too, so it's not just this one guy (some of the other characters are women, with names, and exciting careers in NASA, but this really is a book about this one guy stuck on Mars). I think it strikes the right balance (or at least *a* right balance) between boring tedium and EXTREME PERIL, and I found it very hard to put down.

Reading:Epic Measures (Jeremy N Smith) this is a biography of a guy who decided that What We Need (tm) is a big database of what kills and hurts who when where why how etc. As yet there is not much of an answer to the questions... interesting but not as gripping as stories with SPACE and PERIL.

Next: Oh, I don't know. Just started this one anyway.
naath: (Default)
Still reading Station 11.

Have pre-ordered Jo Walton's latest (Philosopher Kings, sequel to the Just City) which might or might not be next depending how fast I read Station 11.
naath: (Default)
Finished:
Long Utopia. PTerry and S. Baxter.

Not, I think, as good as the previous. And sadly now PTerry is dead :( I enjoyed it all the same.

Reading:

Station Eleven. Just started, not really got an opinion yet.

Next:

uhhhhh, dunno.

Profile

naath: (Default)
naath

August 2017

S M T W T F S
  12345
6 789101112
13141516171819
20212223 242526
2728293031  

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags